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Why Djokovic is said to be the lonely champion? (Part 3)

Federer was always pompous and polite while Nadal lived the principles and modesty. Djokovic’s problem is clear that he cannot hide his negative emotions in every match. Djokovic was inherently unpopular, and it was the fastest way for him to turn into the villain in the eyes of most tennis viewers.

“Nole” may not be as flexible as Federer or as industrious as Nadal, but if you combine Federer’s IQ and Nadal’s endurance, you can create a Djokovic-like player. Technically, Serbian tennis players have clearly reached the level of at least the level of two seniors, to join them in creating the concept of “Big 3”.

But from the perspective of the fans, there is no compelling reason to explain that a player with 276 weeks ranked number one in the world, owns 17 Grand Slams, won the Masters 1000 and ATP Finals, confronted marginally better than both Nadal and Federer, hated so much.

Federer as the artist, with perfection as perfect and accurate as a Swiss watch, Nadal is like a warrior, with the power of a Spanish gaur, combining these two extremes, you have a battle to be expected and be forever mentioning, Djokovic, nicknamed “Iron Man”, who grew up in Serbia in the bombardment of war, experienced hardship and hardship, was an outsider in the battle between ‘Artist’ and ‘ Combatant”.

The estrangement of the crowd on the field does not affect Djokovic’s behavior in real life. Present at most major tournaments, Ben Rothenberg, one of the New York Times’ tennis managers, revealed that Djokovic is the most generous and friendly tennis player he has ever seen.

However, Djokovic – who has never denied his desire to become the greatest player – once again chose the title over the love of the audience. In a frustrated mood, the Serbian tennis player still managed to use tactical acumen and experience to adjust everything back to the right trajectory.

Won the 17th Grand Slam and regained the number one position in the world, Djokovic simultaneously approached the two records he considered the most important in a player’s career. He is only three weeks behind Federer and Grand Slam and 34 weeks at the top of the ATP. Djokovic is causing those who do not support him to expect a miracle that derailed the most destructive machine of felt in the past 10 years.

But there is a simpler option for all, which is to enjoy the best tennis and appreciate more of what Djokovic has brought to the sport: the fierce competition unprecedented in history.